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An extract from:
"Bulmer's 1890 History, Topography &
Directory of North Yorkshire"


Meeting House
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Page four

Renovation
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Page five

 

The followers of George Fox are a numerous and respectable body in the parish. Their meeting house is a commodious building, with a pretty graveyard attached. Adjoining is the Friends' North of England Agricultural School, founded in 1841 by the voluntary contributions of members of the Society of Friends, the largest donor being Thomas Richardson, Esq., of Ayton, who gave the handsome sum of 5,000. A gentleman's residence and an estate of nearly 70 acres were purchased for the purposes of the school, and many additions have since been made to the premises, which occupy a beautiful and salubrious situation, with large and well sheltered recreation and play grounds. The school was established for the maintenance of 36 boys and the same number of girls belonging to or connected with the Society of Friends; others are admitted at a charge representing about the average cost of each child per annum. There is now accommodation for 80 boarders. The course of instruction embraces Latin, French, Euclid, Geometry, Algebra, and various scientific subjects - Agriculture, Chemistry, Physiology, Botany, &c. The girls are trained either for domestic work or a higher sphere of life. The management is vested in a committee of ladies and gentlemen, members of the Society of Friends; Ralph Dixon, superintendent, who is assisted by an efficient staff of teachers. A little distance from the school are the Cleveland Cottages, a block of four very neat brick dwellings, erected and partially endowed by the trustees of the late Thomas Richardson, Esq., in pursuance of his of expressed intention had his life been prolonged. They are for the reception four poor families belonging to the Society of Friends, who, besides a free house, receive 12 per annum.

Few villages possess so many educational facilities as Great Ayton. In 1704, a small school-house was built by Michael Postgate; this was again rebuilt in 1785. It was in this humble seminary that Captain Cook received his school education, at the expense of Thomas Scottowe, Esq., for whom Cook's father was then hind or farm bailiff. This school was superseded by a handsome stone structure, built at the sole expense of G. Marwood, Esq., of Busby Hall, in 1851, and was chiefly supported by that gentleman during his lifetime. It was originally known as Marwood's Grammar School, but is now a Public Elementary School in connection with the parish church. The British School was erected by subscription, in 1843, at a cost of 500, for the education of 50 boys and 50 girls. It receives 100 per annum, the dividends of four railway shares left by the late Mr. Thomas Richardson for the education of poor children in Great Ayton, without respect to religions creed or persuasion, provided the school or schools be conducted on the system promoted by the British and Foreign School Society.

The Cemetery, covering two acres, is situated a little out of the village, and was opened for interments in 1882. The grounds are tastefully laid out. The entire cost was 2,000.

CHARITIES. John Coulson, in 1674, bequeathed to the poor of Great and Little Ayton, a yearly rent-charge of 1 15s; and in 1678, William Young left to the poor of Great Ayton another rent-charge of 6. To the poor of the same township Eliz. Bulson bequeathed the rent of three acres of land at Falsgrave, near Scarborough. Postgate's old school, with other buildings belonging thereto, is now converted into a dwelling-house, let for 10, which is given in equal shares to the support of Marwood's and the British Schools.

LITTLE AYTON WITH TUNSTALL contains, by ordnance measurement, 1,378 acres, of which 1,290 acres are under assessment. Gross estimated rental, 1,581 ; rateable value, 1,437. The principal landowners are the trustees of the late Mrs. Procter and Jonathan, B. Hodgkin, Esq.

The village of Little Ayton is a scattered hamlet between Great Ayton and. Roseberry Topping. There was formerly a chapel here, built by Sir William Malabisse, in 1215, but no remains are now left to tell where it stood.

 

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